+#

   Beer Monopoly

    About

    News

    International Reports

    Blotter

    Contact

    Home


 

>>Video


On our own behalf – The Beer Monopoly on the Forbes List „Best Booze Books of 2017“

We are speechless. Surprised. Humbled. Incredibly grateful. Our book The Beer Monopoly appears on this year`s Forbes List "Best Booze Books". No, no, it`s not the Forbes Rich List. Fat chance of us ever getting on to that one.
The list was compiled by Tara Nurin and can be found here >>


_____________________________________________________________________________________________________


Posted August 2020

USA – Boston Beer’s share price surges on hard seltzer sales

Boston Beer has been one of the stay-at-home winners. Boosted by strong sales of its Truly Hard Seltzer, Boston Beer delivered excellent second quarter 2020 results, even exceeding analysts’ expectations. In the quarter to the end of June, Boston Beer’s net turnover surged 42 percent to USD 452 million year-on-year, topping Wall Street’s estimates of USD 426 million. This was fuelled by a 39.8 percent jump in volume sales. Net income, meanwhile, rose 116 percent to USD 60 million. Following the announcement, Boston Beer’s stock climbed more than 20 percent to USD 828 per share on 24 July 2020. Read on


USA – Sales of hard seltzer continue to rise

With sales tripling in 2019, the low-calorie fruity boozy water continues to be a sensation. The segment leader, White Claw, owned by Mark Anthony Brands, now outsells Budweiser, while number two, Boston Beer’s Truly is bigger than Heineken. According to data published by Nielsen, White Claw commanded a 5 percent share of dollars within the beer category for the four-week period ending 27 June. Meanwhile, the second-ranking Truly is now bigger than Heineken, having surged to a 2.6 percent share. Read on


USA – Boston Beer agrees to new beer distribution laws in Massachusetts

Although Boston Beer is the looser, it still agreed to revised beer distribution laws in its home state of Massachusetts, which will allow small craft brewers to now choose their own distributor. Call it a leftover from Prohibition that even after it came to an end, in most states, brewers large or small still cannot legally sell directly to customers (outside their own taprooms, allowed in many states). Instead they must go through distributors. Read on


Belgium – AB-InBev takes charge for Africa

AB-InBev’s performance in the second quarter took a bad hit. Profits were down by a third, while beer sales declined about 17 percent, in line with turnover shrinking 17 percent to USD 10 billion year-on-year. In April, volume sales declined 32.4 percent, in May they were down 21.4 percent, but in June they grew by 0.7 percent, as countries began to ease lockdown regulations. AB-InBev said on 30 July 2020 that it was excited by the reopening of bars, but cautious given renewed restrictions in certain markets and a second ban on alcohol sales from mid-July in South Africa. Read on


United Kingdom – Keg beer’s miraculous rejuvenation?

Responding to accusations that it has re-labelled old kegs with new best-before-dates, Heineken has said that the unbroached kegs, which had been repatriated during the lockdown, have been kept in optimum conditions and are therefore fit to be redistributed. According to the website The Morning Advertiser, publicans had complained about receiving re-labelled kegs from the brewer ahead of the reopening of pubs. A spokesperson for Heineken was quoted as saying that the Dutch brewer has been very transparent about extending the best-before-date on its kegs. All its kegs will have the longer best-before-date on. Read on


Germany – Covid-19 pandemic sends beer sales tumbling

In the first half of 2020, beer sales fell 6.6 percent (or 3 million hl) to around 43 million hl compared with the same period 2019, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) reported on 30 July 2020. The figure doesn’t include non-alcoholic beers and malt drinks, as well as beer imported from countries outside the European Union (EU). 82.3 percent of total beer sales were destined for domestic consumption and were taxed. Exports to EU countries were down 18 percent in the first half. Read on

 

ARCHIV

2020 july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2019 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april ·
march · february · january
2018 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2017 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2016 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2015 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2014 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2013 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2012 december · november · october · september · august ·  july · june · may · april · march · february · january
2011 december · november · october · september · august · july · june · may · april · march · february · january